IN THE NEWS

  • US water stress may drive shift to renewable power
    By Gerard Wynn
    Global Climate Change News & Analysis
    Updated on 21 June 2014, 5:43 am
    Climate change may drive a shift to more wind and solar power generation, to conserve water, a U.S. Department of Energy report said this week. The report found a risky mutual dependence between water and energy. Energy was needed to pump, treat and transport water, while water was needed to cool electricity generating equipment in thermal power plants such as gas, coal, nuclear and concentrated solar power.  Such thermoelectric power accounts for 40% of all U.S. freshwater use.

    Climate change including more storms and droughts would intensify those mutual risks, the report said.  READ MORE

  • Eight ways climate change is making the world more dangerous

    By Suzanne Goldberg, The Guardian

    Disasters including storms, floods and heatwaves have increased fivefold since the 1970s, UN finds.

    Forget the future. The world already is nearly five times as dangerous and disaster prone as it was in the 1970s, because of the increasing risks brought by climate change, according to a new report from the World Meteorological Organisation.

    The first decade of the 21st century saw 3,496 natural disasters from floods, storms, droughts and heat waves. That was nearly five times as many disasters as the 743 catastrophes reported during the 1970s – and all of those weather events are influenced by climate change.

    The bottom line: natural disasters are occurring nearly five times as often as they were in the 1970s. But some disasters – such as floods and storms – pose a bigger threat than others. Flooding and storms are also taking a bigger bite out of the economy. But heat waves are an emerging killer.  READ MORE

  • The Warming State of the Climate in 2013
    By
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has released State of the Climate, 2013 — a useful compendium of trends and climate events last year. Visit climate.gov to click for the data on Arctic conditions, sea level change, severe storms and more. The report is also being published as a supplement to the July issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.     READ MORE
  • Study: Sea-level rise threatens 1,400 U.S. cities

    USA Today, May 12, 2013
    By Wendy Koch

    How bad is the sea-level rise? Though scientists debate the severity, a new study says at least 316 U.S. cities and towns will be mostly submerged unless pollution can be pulled from the sky.
    A rise in sea levels threatens the viability of more than 1,400 cities and towns, including Miami, Virginia Beach and Jacksonville, unless there are deep cuts in heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions, says an analysis out Monday.
    Prior emissions have already locked in 4 feet of future sea-level rise that will submerge parts of 316 municipalities, but the timing is unclear and could take hundreds of years, according to the paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If global warming continues at its current rate through the year 2100, at least an additional 1,100 cities and towns will be mostly under water at high tide in the distant future. READ MORE

  • Climate change on pace to occur 10 times faster than any change recorded in past…

    Stanford Report, August 1, 2013

    The planet is undergoing one of the largest changes in climate since the dinosaurs went extinct. But what might be even more troubling for humans, plants and animals is the speed of the change. Stanford climate scientists warn that the likely rate of change over the next century will be at least 10 times quicker than any climate shift in the past 65 million years.
    If the trend continues at its current rapid pace, it will place significant stress on terrestrial ecosystems around the world, and many species will need to make behavioral, evolutionary or geographic adaptations to survive. READ MORE


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